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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Despite the morning rain, we hope you are still able to celebrate Bike to Work Day! Whether it's for your commute, exercise, or fun, we encourage you to get out and bike today. #BikeToWorkDay
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO participated in the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) Supplier Diversity & Procurement Summit, along with other organizations, to share information about contracting opportunities with our office. It was great to engage with the business owners and expand our procurement network.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Join us as we highlight the Human Resources Department! They take pride in being a resource for all employees. No matter the need, from strategic planning, policy interpretation, or payroll assistance, the team is available to help. Thanks for being #TeamFCEO.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Mental Health Awareness Week (May 13th-19th) emphasizes the importance of taking care of your mental health. This year’s theme, Movement: Moving More for Our Mental Health, highlights the impact physical activity has on improving our mental wellbeing. #MomentsForMovement
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The following roads will be resurfaced May 13, 2024 through May 17, 2024, weather permitting. Please expect intermittent lane closures while this work is being completed.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry One

Surveyor’s Journal Entry One

The First Survey Leads to War

“This place (between the Licking and Scioto Rivers) is fine rich level land with large meadows, clover bottoms, spacious plains covered with wild rye; the woods chiefly large walnuts and hickories here and there mixed with Poplar, Cherry, and Sugar Trees,” wrote Surveyor Christopher Gist on January 20, 1751 while leading the first European survey party to explore and journal rudimentary observations in Ohio.

Gist, the son of Surveyor Richard Gist who helped plat the City of Baltimore, Maryland, was working for the Ohio Company of Virginia when he entered Ohio from the area of modern-day Beaver County, Pennsylvania. His party journeyed west and then south to the future sites of Lisbon, Bolivar, Coshocton, Zanesville, Lancaster, and Circleville, before heading down the Scioto River to Chillicothe and Portsmouth. They then turned northwest towards Cincinnati and up the Great Miami River to the Miami Indian Village of Pickawillany, near Piqua, where a trading outpost had been established in 1749, before he turned south to Kentucky.

Under a grant from the British Crown, the Ohio Company of Virginia had planned to initially colonize 200,000 acres of land at the forks of the Ohio River (at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) and to explore west of the Appalachian Mountains so that trade could be established with Native Americans.

The British presence, however, was viewed as an incursion on the New France territory of “Upper Louisiana,” which included Ohio. The area had been most recently visited and marked, in 1749, by a French military expedition commanded by Pierre-Joseph Celeron de Bienville, who oversaw the burying of six lead plates and the posting of placards that declared the sovereignty of King Louis XV near the major tributaries of the Ohio River. The bountiful lands were desired for future settlement, agriculture, and the lucrative fur trade.

On June 21, 1752, French troops, accompanied by Ottawa and Chippewa warriors, attacked and destroyed the fortified Village of Pickawillany. This was the start of a long period of unrest in the disputed area.

Peace would not come to the Ohio country until after the fighting of the French and Indian War (1754-1763), Pontiac’s Rebellion (1763-1766), the American Revolution (1775-1783), the Ohio Indian Wars (1783-1813), and the War of 1812 (1812-15) when land claims were ultimately settled and pioneers began moving west.