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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Despite the morning rain, we hope you are still able to celebrate Bike to Work Day! Whether it's for your commute, exercise, or fun, we encourage you to get out and bike today. #BikeToWorkDay
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO participated in the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) Supplier Diversity & Procurement Summit, along with other organizations, to share information about contracting opportunities with our office. It was great to engage with the business owners and expand our procurement network.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Join us as we highlight the Human Resources Department! They take pride in being a resource for all employees. No matter the need, from strategic planning, policy interpretation, or payroll assistance, the team is available to help. Thanks for being #TeamFCEO.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Mental Health Awareness Week (May 13th-19th) emphasizes the importance of taking care of your mental health. This year’s theme, Movement: Moving More for Our Mental Health, highlights the impact physical activity has on improving our mental wellbeing. #MomentsForMovement
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The following roads will be resurfaced May 13, 2024 through May 17, 2024, weather permitting. Please expect intermittent lane closures while this work is being completed.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Twenty-Three

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Twenty-Three

The Dawn of Modern Surveying and Road Construction

By the early 1900s, the Franklin County surveyor was actively replacing stone survey monuments with iron pins. This endeavor was symbolic of the start of the modern age of surveying. The magnetic characteristics of the metal enabled the markers to be readily retrieved for the establishment of precise vertical control throughout the area.

Surveys started in 1899 by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (CGS), under the federal Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Geological Survey created the first coast-to-coast survey record of the nation, including precise topographic and hydrologic maps of Franklin County.

New local surveys and land use plans lead to the formal establishment of the “Columbus enclave” communities of Marble Cliff (1901), Grandview Heights (1906), Bexley (1908), Whitehall (1910) and Upper Arlington (1913).

Following the devastating Flood of 1913, the City of Columbus joined with the Franklin County Surveyor, The Ohio State University and the CGS to conduct a precise survey of 80 square miles of the city, using horizontal and vertical control, in preparation for land redevelopment and flood control projects.

The start of the “Auto Age” brought about a renewed effort to improve the area’s transportation infrastructure. The introduction of asphalt and concrete pavements finally provided a lasting solution to the problem of muddy and rut-filled streets.

During the Great Depression, the Federal Works Progress Administration, Public Works Administration, and Civilian Conservation Corps put thousands of unemployed Ohioans back to work building roads, bridges, drainage, and landscape infrastructure. The average annual application of hot mix asphalt on the state’s thoroughfares rose more than 1,000 percent from 19,400 tons in 1929 to 210,000 tons by 1940.

Amidst this prolific period of construction, the Ohio Legislature officially redesignated the position of “County Surveyor” to that of “County Engineer,” in 1935, to officially provide for both the surveying and highway engineering needs of the state’s evolving counties. Only those who hold both an Ohio Professional Engineers (P.E.) and Professional Surveyors (P.S.) license may qualify for the publically elected office. Past Franklin County Surveyors and Engineers (link within site)