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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO attended the Pre-Bid Information Session for the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health (ADAMH) Board of Franklin County which provided networking opportunities with minority owned businesses.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO participated in the Franklin County Futures Job Fair where we shared information about employment opportunities at our office. It was a great event!
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Smiley Road, between Fishinger Road and Hilliard-Cemetery Road, will be closed from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, January 27, 2023, for roadway maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting. Local Access will be maintained.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Thanks to everyone who attended the Opportunities Job Fair! We had a great time meeting with people excited to learn about our internship and seasonal opportunities at the FCEO. If you are still interested in joining #TeamFCEO, please visit https://www.franklincountyengineer.org/employment/ to learn more.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The Franklin County Sheriff's Office has declared a LEVEL ONE Snow Emergency. Roadways are hazardous with blowing and drifting snow. Roads may also be icy. Motorists are urged to drive very cautiously.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Twenty-Two

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Twenty-Two

Land Acts Provide for Education

The plan to create and fund public schools with the proceeds from the sale of federally owned land had its origins in the Land Ordinance of 1785, which called for section 16 of every township to be used or sold for education purposes.

In the spirit of the original land for education provision, Vermont Senator Justin Smith Morrill sponsored the Land Grant College Act, which President Lincoln signed into law on July 2, 1862. The legislation, commonly referred to as the “Morrill Act,” offered federal land grants to states that agreed to establish a college dedicated to the teaching of agriculture and mechanical arts.

For every senator and representative a state had in congress, 30,000 acres were to be awarded. At the time, Ohio had 21 congressional members and thus received 360,000 acres.

Since there was no longer any federally owned land for sale in Ohio, the state was given land scrip (promissory notes) that could be used to acquire public land elsewhere.

Proceeds from the sale of the scrip, totaling about $342,000, enabled Ohio to start a university endowment fund.

Ohio also benefited from the sale of nearly 77,000 acres of former Virginia Military District land ceded to the state by Congress in 1871. These proceeds were collected into the 1940’s and added to the university endowment.

The Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College, now known as The Ohio State University, was established in 1870 on a 327-acre farm, in Clinton Township, donated by William Neil, (hotel, stagecoach, and railroad entrepreneur). The site was desired for its proximity to Columbus and adequate water supply.

Joseph Sullivant served on the college governing board and was instrumental in the start of the broad liberal arts curriculum that the university offers today.