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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Roundabouts have proven to be safe and beneficial to our communities. FCEO-maintained roundabouts follow national trends by decreasing overall crashes and crash related injuries. Let's keep decreasing crashes by always being alert and cautious when driving through roundabouts.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate #HispanicHeritageMonth, we highlight Evelyn Cortez-Davis. She is a civil engineer who earned her degree from UCLA. She is the first Latina appointed Director of Water Engineering and Technical Services for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Engineer Robertson hosted a Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Civil Engineering Career Expo in conjunction with HBCU Week to introduce students to career opportunities in the Central Ohio area. Thank you to all that participated in this great event.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
With more and more roundabouts coming to Central Ohio, it is always important to know how to navigate them safely and efficiently. Check out this video from our neighbors at New Albany, Ohio Government, discussing roundabout reminders. #RoundaboutsWeek
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate National Roundabouts Week, we want to help you understand why we support roundabouts. Our friends from the Durham Region put together a great video that highlights the benefits of roundabouts. Check it out!
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Fifteen

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Fifteen

The Capital’s First Thoroughfares are Set

The principle thoroughfares of Columbus were set to cross each other at right angles with High Street, the major north-south route, bearing 12 degrees west of north, and Broad Street, the major east-west route, 12 degrees north of east. The exact reason for the city’s positioning remains unknown, but one theory suggests that the city is skewed 12 degrees to line up with the streets of Franklinton. Another consideration is the fact that at the time the difference between True North and Magnetic North was 12 degrees. A plat of the town not corrected for the difference would, in fact, skew 12 degrees west of north.

The other original north-south roads, from west to east, were West Street, Water Street, Third Street, Fourth Street, Seventh Street, and Meadow Lane. East-West Roads, north to south, included Last Street, North Street, Spring Street, Long Street, Gay Street, State Street, Town Street, Rich Street, Friend Street, South Street, and Public Lane.

The widest of these boulevards, surpassing the typical road width of 82.5 feet, were Broad Street (120 feet) and High Street (100 feet) that were envisioned as major arteries for travel and commerce leading to Capital Square.