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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO attended the Pre-Bid Information Session for the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health (ADAMH) Board of Franklin County which provided networking opportunities with minority owned businesses.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO participated in the Franklin County Futures Job Fair where we shared information about employment opportunities at our office. It was a great event!
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Smiley Road, between Fishinger Road and Hilliard-Cemetery Road, will be closed from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, January 27, 2023, for roadway maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting. Local Access will be maintained.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Thanks to everyone who attended the Opportunities Job Fair! We had a great time meeting with people excited to learn about our internship and seasonal opportunities at the FCEO. If you are still interested in joining #TeamFCEO, please visit https://www.franklincountyengineer.org/employment/ to learn more.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The Franklin County Sheriff's Office has declared a LEVEL ONE Snow Emergency. Roadways are hazardous with blowing and drifting snow. Roads may also be icy. Motorists are urged to drive very cautiously.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Fourteen

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Fourteen

Columbus is Chosen to be the State Capital

Nearly a decade after its organization, Ohio still sought a permanent location for its capital. Chillicothe served as the first provisional seat of government, from 1803 to 1810, before the legislature relocated to Zanesville, and then back to Chillicothe in 1812.

The communities of Delaware, Dublin, Franklinton, and Worthington had all been under consideration until Valentine’s Day 1812 when the legislature ratified a plan proposed by Franklin County landholders Lyne Starling (Lucas Sullivant’s brother-in-law), James Johnston, Alexander McLaughlin, and John Kerr. They had purchased land and land warrants from Canadian refugees and their agents to form a proprietorship dedicated to the building of a new capital on the high bank of the Scioto River, opposite Franklinton. Their property, not far from the geographical center of the state, was described as “ native forest on half sections number twenty-five and twenty-six, and part of half sections number ten and eleven, all in Montgomery Township five, range twenty-two of the Refugee Tract.”

The name “Columbus,” honoring explorer Christopher Columbus, was suggested by state senator and prominent Franklinton resident Joseph Foos during his introduction of legislation to create the new capital.

The proprietors agreed to designate a ten acre square for the situation of public buildings and an additional ten acres for the penitentiary. They also agreed to erect or cover the construction costs of the new state house, penitentiary, and other public buildings, as requested by the legislature, in exchange for their ability to apportion and sell land.

Federal Architect Joel Wright, from Niles, Ohio and Franklin County Surveyor Joseph Vance were selected by the Ohio Legislature to survey and layout the new town in a manner similar to the popular urban designs of Colonial America.