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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is closed for bridge maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is now open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
We’re only a few days into fall but snow and ice preparations are underway! #TeamFCEO has been working hard getting our vehicles and equipment ready for the upcoming winter season. #winteriscoming
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is closed for bridge improvements. This closure is expected to last two days, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Roundabouts have proven to be safe and beneficial to our communities. FCEO-maintained roundabouts follow national trends by decreasing overall crashes and crash related injuries. Let's keep decreasing crashes by always being alert and cautious when driving through roundabouts.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Five

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Five

Franklinton and Worthington are the County’s First Towns

Gift Street was the first thoroughfare laid out in Franklinton by Deputy Surveyor Lucas Sullivant who gifted land around it to encourage settlers to stay in his fledgling community. Despite an abundance of fine farm and grazing land, and wild game, it was difficult, at first, to maintain a consistent populace. Floodwater from the Scioto River washed away many of the original cabins followed by seasonal outbreaks of fever.

By 1801, however, Franklinton’s population grew to the point where a schoolmaster, general store, and grist mill were needed. At the time, land was priced between one and two dollars per acre, making the community an economical destination for pioneers.

The town was laid out in a grid pattern of street blocks that contained fours lots each. The lots were 99 feet wide and 115 feet deep and abutted the rear of the next block. On the outskirts, lots varied in size from 100 to 200 acres.

Eight miles up the Olentangy (Whetstone) River, Deputy Surveyor James Kilbourne (President of The Scioto Land Company of Granby, Connecticut) scouted the sight for the town of Worthington in 1802. He chose 8,000 acres in the U.S. Military District that had been originally surveyed in 1797 by Deputy Surveyor Israel Ludlow (an assistant to Thomas Hutchins from Morristown, New Jersey and one of the founders of Cincinnati).

The town was divided into 160 three quarter acre lots with a 5-acre public green in the center. Farther out, farm lots ranged in size from 20 to 130 acres.

Named initially for the Hamlet of Worthington, Connecticut, it became generally accepted that esteemed Surveyor and Politician Thomas Worthington, who was a close Kilbourne associate, would be the community’s namesake.

By the time Ohio was admitted to the Union as the seventeenth state on March 1, 1803, there were nearly 400 land claims in Franklinton, which served as the county seat until 1824, and 100 in Worthington.