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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is closed for bridge maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is now open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
We’re only a few days into fall but snow and ice preparations are underway! #TeamFCEO has been working hard getting our vehicles and equipment ready for the upcoming winter season. #winteriscoming
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is closed for bridge improvements. This closure is expected to last two days, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Seven

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Seven

Original Maps Set Parameters for Land Development

Even though Ohio’s population was less than the 60,000 required for statehood, Congress was confident that its efforts to allocate and sell public land would result in steady growth. The slow but sure success of the Virginia Military District to attract war veterans to the region exemplified the need to establish political subdivisions that could accommodate an influx of permanent settlers.

The first step in opening up the new state was to create a comprehensive map that set the basic geographic parameters for land development.

While researching potential locations for Worthington, in 1802, Deputy Surveyor James Kilbourne used the land records, survey journals, and maps housed in Deputy Surveyor Thomas Worthington’s Chillicothe office to compile the first map of Ohio. A fairly accurate recollection of Native American territory had been given by Deputy Surveyor John Fitch, a captive during the American Revolution who later invented the first steam powered boat (1787).

Surveyor General Rufus Putnam then elaborated upon the work of U.S. Geographer Thomas Hutchins and James Kilbourne to create the first official map of Ohio, which he submitted to Congress and the Ohio Legislature in January 1804. The division of land was now certifiable and political subdivisions could be established.