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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Roundabouts have proven to be safe and beneficial to our communities. FCEO-maintained roundabouts follow national trends by decreasing overall crashes and crash related injuries. Let's keep decreasing crashes by always being alert and cautious when driving through roundabouts.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate #HispanicHeritageMonth, we highlight Evelyn Cortez-Davis. She is a civil engineer who earned her degree from UCLA. She is the first Latina appointed Director of Water Engineering and Technical Services for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Engineer Robertson hosted a Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Civil Engineering Career Expo in conjunction with HBCU Week to introduce students to career opportunities in the Central Ohio area. Thank you to all that participated in this great event.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
With more and more roundabouts coming to Central Ohio, it is always important to know how to navigate them safely and efficiently. Check out this video from our neighbors at New Albany, Ohio Government, discussing roundabout reminders. #RoundaboutsWeek
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate National Roundabouts Week, we want to help you understand why we support roundabouts. Our friends from the Durham Region put together a great video that highlights the benefits of roundabouts. Check it out!
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Six

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Six

Franklin County Takes Shape After Reaching to Lake Erie

Franklin County, named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, was established by the new state legislature on April 30, 1803. The first surveys of the region were conducted for the federal government by Deputy Surveyors John Matthews (Rufus Putnam’s nephew) and Ebenezer Buckingham (Rufus Putnam’s future son-in-law) in 1799, and by Elnathan Schofield (John Mathew’s business partner and future Pickaway County Surveyor) in 1801.

The county’s original boundaries, “beginning on the western boundary of Range 20 of townships east of the Scioto River, at the corner of Sections 24 and 25, Township 9, Range 21,” reached from the center of modern-day Pickaway County north to Lake Erie and encompassed all of modern-day Madison, Delaware, Marion, Crawford, Wyandot, Seneca, and Sandusky Counties, as well as portions of Union, Champaign, Clarke, Logan, Hardin, Hancock, and Wood Counties.

For the purpose of electing local Justices of the Peace, the Court of Common Pleas first divided the central part of Franklin County into four townships on May 10, 1803. Franklin and Darby Townships were located west of the Scioto River and Harrison and Liberty Townships were located to the east. Lucas Sullivant served as the Clerk of the Court.

The evolution of Franklin County’s shape and size began with the apportioning of land for the formation of Champaign County in 1805 followed by Delaware County in 1808, Pickaway and Madison Counties in 1810, and Union County in 1820. Land was also added from Fairfield County in 1808, Licking County in 1817, and Fairfield County, including the town of Canal Winchester, in 1851, which was the last major change to the county’s boundaries.

Franklin County, which covers 543.9 square miles, is located between 30° 49’N and 40° 7½’N latitude and 82° 45½’W and 83° 15’W longitude. The northern boundary line lies 20 miles south of the geographical center of Ohio. The highest point, located on the northeast boundary with Licking County, is 1,132 feet above sea level.