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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Despite the morning rain, we hope you are still able to celebrate Bike to Work Day! Whether it's for your commute, exercise, or fun, we encourage you to get out and bike today. #BikeToWorkDay
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
#TeamFCEO participated in the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) Supplier Diversity & Procurement Summit, along with other organizations, to share information about contracting opportunities with our office. It was great to engage with the business owners and expand our procurement network.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Join us as we highlight the Human Resources Department! They take pride in being a resource for all employees. No matter the need, from strategic planning, policy interpretation, or payroll assistance, the team is available to help. Thanks for being #TeamFCEO.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Mental Health Awareness Week (May 13th-19th) emphasizes the importance of taking care of your mental health. This year’s theme, Movement: Moving More for Our Mental Health, highlights the impact physical activity has on improving our mental wellbeing. #MomentsForMovement
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The following roads will be resurfaced May 13, 2024 through May 17, 2024, weather permitting. Please expect intermittent lane closures while this work is being completed.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Surveyor’s Journal Entry Six

Surveyor’s Journal Entry Six

Franklin County Takes Shape After Reaching to Lake Erie

Franklin County, named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, was established by the new state legislature on April 30, 1803. The first surveys of the region were conducted for the federal government by Deputy Surveyors John Matthews (Rufus Putnam’s nephew) and Ebenezer Buckingham (Rufus Putnam’s future son-in-law) in 1799, and by Elnathan Schofield (John Mathew’s business partner and future Pickaway County Surveyor) in 1801.

The county’s original boundaries, “beginning on the western boundary of Range 20 of townships east of the Scioto River, at the corner of Sections 24 and 25, Township 9, Range 21,” reached from the center of modern-day Pickaway County north to Lake Erie and encompassed all of modern-day Madison, Delaware, Marion, Crawford, Wyandot, Seneca, and Sandusky Counties, as well as portions of Union, Champaign, Clarke, Logan, Hardin, Hancock, and Wood Counties.

For the purpose of electing local Justices of the Peace, the Court of Common Pleas first divided the central part of Franklin County into four townships on May 10, 1803. Franklin and Darby Townships were located west of the Scioto River and Harrison and Liberty Townships were located to the east. Lucas Sullivant served as the Clerk of the Court.

The evolution of Franklin County’s shape and size began with the apportioning of land for the formation of Champaign County in 1805 followed by Delaware County in 1808, Pickaway and Madison Counties in 1810, and Union County in 1820. Land was also added from Fairfield County in 1808, Licking County in 1817, and Fairfield County, including the town of Canal Winchester, in 1851, which was the last major change to the county’s boundaries.

Franklin County, which covers 543.9 square miles, is located between 30° 49’N and 40° 7½’N latitude and 82° 45½’W and 83° 15’W longitude. The northern boundary line lies 20 miles south of the geographical center of Ohio. The highest point, located on the northeast boundary with Licking County, is 1,132 feet above sea level.