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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Roundabouts have proven to be safe and beneficial to our communities. FCEO-maintained roundabouts follow national trends by decreasing overall crashes and crash related injuries. Let's keep decreasing crashes by always being alert and cautious when driving through roundabouts.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate #HispanicHeritageMonth, we highlight Evelyn Cortez-Davis. She is a civil engineer who earned her degree from UCLA. She is the first Latina appointed Director of Water Engineering and Technical Services for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Engineer Robertson hosted a Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Civil Engineering Career Expo in conjunction with HBCU Week to introduce students to career opportunities in the Central Ohio area. Thank you to all that participated in this great event.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
With more and more roundabouts coming to Central Ohio, it is always important to know how to navigate them safely and efficiently. Check out this video from our neighbors at New Albany, Ohio Government, discussing roundabout reminders. #RoundaboutsWeek
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we celebrate National Roundabouts Week, we want to help you understand why we support roundabouts. Our friends from the Durham Region put together a great video that highlights the benefits of roundabouts. Check it out!
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Highway Chronicle Chapter 7

Highway Chronicle Chapter 7

New Pavement Techniques are Celebrated

working people
working people

In 1867, High Street, between Friend and Naghten Streets, became the first paved boulevard in Franklin County when wooden blocks were laid side by side nearly a foot deep in the earthen surface.

Asphalt pavement, which evolved from the mixing of coal tar with roadway aggregates to create firmly bound surfaces, was heralded with a promenade concert at the State House in 1873 following the resurfacing of High Street.

Colonel N.B. Abbott was contracted to build the county’s first pavements with asphalt, imported from Trinidad, on State Street, from High Street to Third Avenue, in 1876, and a three-mile stretch of High Street, from Naghten Street to the Columbus north corporation line, in 1877.

Heavy wear led to the reconstruction of High Street in the downtown area with Medina Stone and Georgia Granite block in 1885, and later Trinidad Asphalt in 1915.

George Bartholomew, inventor and founder of The Buckeye Portland Cement Company, was honored at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago for his construction of the nation’s first concrete streets in Bellefontaine, Ohio in 1891. This accolade inspired another famed inventor, Milan, Ohio native Thomas Edison to further develop the new road-building technology. The Edison Portland Cement Company laid the nation’s “first mile” of concrete pavement, in 1912, during the construction of the Morris Turnpike (S.R. 57) near New Village, New Jersey.

Ohio’s first major stretch of concrete highway was laid in 1923 during the construction of the Warren G. Harding Highway (U.S. Route 30), near Lima, which was part of the cross-country Lincoln Highway system.

In 1925, Broad Street became the first thoroughfare in Franklin County to be paved with concrete.