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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Morse Road is closed between the county line and Babbitt Road for a bridge deck replacement. The road will remain closed for three weeks or until the replacement is completed.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
It's National Work Zone Awareness Week! This week, we will focus on raising awareness and encouraging drivers to use caution when driving through work zones. Let's protect our workers, pedestrians, and motorists! Drive Safe. Work Safe. Save Lives. #NWZAW
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
The Reese Road 0.23 over Big Walnut Creek project is underway. Complete General Construction Company is actively working on the demotion phase of this improvement project. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Walker Road between Carter Road and Davis Road is now open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Highway Chronicle Chapter 10

Highway Chronicle Chapter 10

Legislators Lay the Foundation for State and Federal Highways

road
road

In 1912, the Ohio Legislature gave the state highway department authority to establish and oversee an Inter-County Highway System. The inclusion of more than 9,000 miles of major roadway lead to further legislation in 1921 that enabled the state to actively plan, design, build and maintain highways from newly created district offices.

At the federal level, the first road aid act was passed by Congress in 1916 and provided $75 million in matching funds to state highway agencies “to get American drivers out of the mud.”

Later, the Federal Highway Act of 1921 established the Bureau of Public Roads and supplied another $75 million in matching funds to help develop the Lincoln Highway, which became the first paved two-lane intercontinental automobile route between New York and San Francisco. The Ohio portion followed U.S. Route 30 from East Liverpool westward through Van Wert to the Indiana line.

During the Great Depression, the Federal Works Progress Administration, Public Works Administration, and Civilian Conservation Corps put thousands of unemployed Ohioans back to work building roads, bridges, drainage, and landscape infrastructure. The average annual application of hot mix asphalt on the state’s thoroughfares rose more than 1,000 percent from 19,400 tons in 1929 to 210,000 tons by 1940.

Amidst this great period of construction, the Ohio Legislature officially re-designated the position of “County Surveyor” to that of “County Engineer,” in 1935, to provide for the building and maintenance of county roads and bridges.