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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is closed for bridge maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is now open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
We’re only a few days into fall but snow and ice preparations are underway! #TeamFCEO has been working hard getting our vehicles and equipment ready for the upcoming winter season. #winteriscoming
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is closed for bridge improvements. This closure is expected to last two days, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Highway Chronicle Chapter 1

Highway Chronicle Chapter 1

Native American Paths Serve as Early Roads

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Metropolitan Columbus has not always been a maze of highways, roads and streets. In fact, shortly after the founding of Ohio and Franklin County in 1803, the only means of travel were by buffalo traces, Native American paths, and swift flowing rivers.

‘Roads’ throughout the state were those wild thoroughfares with the fewest tree stumps, potholes and brush. But access to the central Ohio area that would become Columbus could not be denied.

One of the most significant Native American routes, adopted by pioneers, was the Scioto Trail that followed the Scioto, Little Scioto, and Sandusky Rivers from Lower Shawnee Town (Portsmouth) north to Lake Erie. The widely traveled path illustrated the economic and social importance of roadways, serving as a lifeline for the frontier settlements of Chillicothe, Franklinton, and Worthington. Proximity to the trail was a deciding factor in locating Columbus at the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers.

A need for less cumbersome travel to Newark leads the state legislature to incorporate the Franklin Turnpike Company in 1816. Settler and surveyor Lucas Sullivant, founder of Franklinton, guided the civic organization that oversaw the joining of old trails with newly built roads to establish the area’s first official highway.

By 1820, entrepreneur Philip Zinn was operating the first weekly mail and passenger stagecoach service to Newark, Lancaster, Chillicothe, Springfield and Worthington. An early advertisement proclaimed that a trip from Cincinnati, through Dayton and Columbus, to Upper Sandusky could be made in four days, traveling 50 miles per day.