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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Harlem Road, between E. Dublin-Granville Road and Warner Road, is closed for bridge maintenance. This closure is expected to last one day, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is now open to traffic.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
We’re only a few days into fall but snow and ice preparations are underway! #TeamFCEO has been working hard getting our vehicles and equipment ready for the upcoming winter season. #winteriscoming
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Clime Road North, between Clime Road and Georgesville Road, is closed for bridge improvements. This closure is expected to last two days, weather permitting.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
As we conclude another great #RoundaboutsWeek, we are happy to announce that the Morse Road at Babbitt Road improvement project is progressing well. Our contractor, Strawser Paving Inc., is working diligently to keep this project on schedule. Check back soon for updates.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Roundabouts have proven to be safe and beneficial to our communities. FCEO-maintained roundabouts follow national trends by decreasing overall crashes and crash related injuries. Let's keep decreasing crashes by always being alert and cautious when driving through roundabouts.
Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Highway Chronicle Chapter 2

Highway Chronicle Chapter 2

Columbus is Established as New Ohio Capital

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Chillicothe and Zanesville served as the provisional capitals of Ohio until February 14, 1812 when the state legislature chose native forest on the high bank of the Scioto River, across from the settlement of Franklinton, to become the new capital. Architect Joel Wright and Franklin County Surveyor Joseph Vance were assigned the task of surveying and laying out a new town that reflected the popular urban designs of Colonial America.

The principle thoroughfares were set to cross each other at right angles with High Street, the major north-south route, bearing 12 degrees west of north, and Broad Street, the major east-west route, 12 degrees north of east. The exact reason for the city’s positioning remains unknown, but one theory suggests that the city is skewed 12 degrees to line up with the streets of Franklinton. Another consideration is the fact that at the time the difference between True North and Magnetic North was 12 degrees. A plat of the town not corrected for the difference would, in fact, skew 12 degrees west of north (shown here).

The other original north-south roads, from west to east, were West Street, Water Street, Third Street, Fourth Street, Seventh Street, and Meadow Lane. East-West Roads, north to south, included Last Street, North Street, Spring Street, Long Street, Gay Street, State Street, Town Street, Rich Street, Friend Street, South Street, and Public Lane.

The widest of these boulevards, surpassing the typical road width of 82.5 feet, were Broad Street (120 feet) and High Street (100 feet) that were envisioned as major arteries for travel and commerce leading to Capital Square (shown here) .

In 1816, Ohio government established permanent residence in its newly formed crossroads home.

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