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Franklin County Engineer

As a local public works agency headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, the Franklin County Engineer's Office is responsible for the maintenance and construction of 271 miles of county roadway and 351 county bridges, as well as upkeep of all county ditches, drains, retention basins, and other storm water facilities within the right-of-way of county roads in unincorporated areas. To meet the continuing development and infrastructure needs of Franklin County, the Engineer's Office utilizes the latest technologies for determining and maintaining roadway centerlines and boundaries; retracing and setting new monuments for original public land surveys; preparing geographic information system mapping for real estate tax assessments; and establishing precise countywide horizontal and vertical control to maintain uniformity in construction, surveying, and mapping.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Our Records Department manages thousands of records including maps, surveys, plats, etc., and using the RIM life cycle has helped keep them organized. Check out these key steps that may help improve your organization's records management. #RIMMonth
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Let’s help keep our roads safe by reducing distracted driving. Check out this video from the National Safety Council on how to safely prepare for your drive before you depart. #DistractedDrivingAwarenessMonth
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Congratulations to Engineer Robertson and #TeamFCEO for being named “Local Public Agency of the Year” at the Ohio Department of Transportation 2021 Civil Rights Transportation Symposium. The award recognizes a Local Public Agency's commitment to diversity, equity, & inclusion in the transportation industry.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
NBC4i's Allen Henry joined Engineer Robertson and Bridge Engineer, Ed Herrick, to discuss the proposed infrastructure stimulus plan and how local roadways and bridges could benefit from the funding. Be sure to tune in to NBC tonight at 6:00 p.m. for the full story.
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
Meet Jimmy Garner! He's been with FCEO for over a year and currently works at our West Maintenance Facility. In his spare time, Jimmy enjoys hunting, fishing, and spending time with friends. Thanks, Jimmy, for being #TeamFCEO! #WorkerWednesday
Franklin County Engineer
Franklin County Engineer
April is Ohio Native Plant Month! Native plants are completely adapted to Ohio's growing conditions and are a source of food for our native insects, birds, and all wildlife. Therefore, we encourage you to visit www.ohionativeplantmonth.org/ to learn more about projects and activities.

Franklin County Engineer's Office
970 DUBLIN ROAD
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43215
(614) 525-3030
fracoeng@franklincountyengineer.org
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Mobility Department

Mobility Department

Mike Andrako, P.E.

Mobility Engineer

The Mobility Engineering Department works to maintain the capacity and safety of county roads. Duties include the design, installation and operation of all forms of traffic control devices, such as pavement striping, traffic signals, road signage and school zone flashers; review of construction plans to ensure proper traffic control, maintenance of traffic, and detour routing; and preparation of traffic studies to determine speed limit reductions and increases, four way stops, and traffic signal locations. They also evaluate new zoning and subdivisions that access county roads to determine if there will be impairments to roadway safety and efficiency.

Access Management Regulations

 

Access management involves providing/managing access to land development while simultaneously preserving the flow of traffic on the surrounding road system in terms of safety, capacity and speed. It protects the major investment of the county roads and is essential to operating them safely and efficiently.

Access management views the highway and the surrounding land as parts of a system; all parts are important and interact with each other. The goal is to coordinate the planning and design of each to preserve the capacity of the overall system, and to allow efficient and safe access to and from the properties.

Most of the cities in Franklin County have had access management standards in various forms for a long time (including Columbus, Hilliard, and Dublin) and the State of Ohio has adopted access management guidelines. A few years ago, the state legislature passed House Bill 366 with created the enabling legislation for counties and townships to adopt access management regulations. Since then many counties have done so.

The proposed County Commissioner’s Resolution starts the process per the ORC for adoption of these regulations on county roadways on the county thoroughfare plan.

Franklin County Access Management Regulations Plan – Adopted 12/17/13

How Speed Limits are Determined